Robots From Tomorrow! (book discussion)

The Man Without Fear is riding a new wave of popularity thanks to having a hit Netflix show under his belt, so Mike & Greg turn their heightened comic senses on one of, if not THE, seminal story about Matt Murdock: Frank Miller & David Mazzucchelli's 'Born Again'. From singles to digital to trade paperback to Artist Edition, this story is a comic booking master class no matter the format you experience it in. Process is dissected, context is given, praise is assigned and heaped, and hearts are broken when one host describes the Artist Edition to the other. But the Hornhead talk doesn't end there! The Netflix show gets its due! Not a complete love fest, but pretty close! Listen on to find out the boys' theories on Madame Gao, what we could look forward to in Seasons 2 & 3, how seeing the show affects reading the comic, which Miller comics make the Holy Trinity of his bibliography (and why), who hears who in their head for which character, why 'Born Again'-type stories rarely work as well with other characters, and more.

Robots From Tomorrow is a weekly comics podcast recorded deep beneath the Earth’s surface. You can subscribe to it via iTunes or through the RSS feed at RobotsFromTomorrow.com. You can also follow Mike and Greg on Twitter. This episode is brought to you by Third Eye Comics. Enjoy your funny books.

Direct download: rft_196_mixdown.mp3
Category:Book Discussion -- posted at: 8:00pm EST

When you think about cartoonist journalists, the first (and probably only) name that comes to mind is almost always Joe Sacco. And for good reason, because the man has been using his cartoonist skills in the service of in-depth reporting for over 20 years. This week, Mike & Greg take a look at “Journalism”, a collection of his shorter reports over a 10-year period from such assignments as Iraq, The Hague, Gaza, India, Malta, and the Caucasus. It’s a 200-page hardcover that provokes more thought and questions in that page count than most OGNs at twice the size. The lads try and come at them from a few different angles, ranging from Sacco’s cartooning chops, how objective a reporter like Sacco can (or should) be, what advantages cartooning has over more naturalistic means of capturing information, why color should or shouldn’t be used in Sacco’s work, who influenced him, and much much more on this week’s episode

Robots From Tomorrow is a weekly comics podcast recorded deep beneath the Earth’s surface. You can subscribe to it via iTunes or through the RSS feed at RobotsFromTomorrow.com. You can also follow Mike and Greg on Twitter. This episode is brought to you by Third Eye Comics. Enjoy your funny books.

Direct download: rft_192_mixdown.mp3
Category:Book Discussion -- posted at: 7:00pm EST

“The death-stench creeps.” “There’s something rotten in Okinawa.” These cover blurbs from today’s book discussion subject should tell you that we’re not talking sweetness and light this week. Mike & Greg go fishing with horror master Junji Ito and the brand-new hardcover collection of his 2001-2002 horror story “Gyo”. How terrifying can a horror story about fish be if 99% of it takes place on land? Ito’s got that covered. Serving up a tale equal parts dread and nihilism, Ito knows what buttons to push in his readers to be effective as a horror master, and he jams them hard here. Find out who Ito took cues from and used as a benchmark to surpass in his story, what the difference is between shonen and seinen manga, how similar “Gyo”’s adaptation into other media is to “Watchmen”’s translation, why a circus can be scarier than a great white shark, which things make the human mind flash ‘DOES NOT COMPUTE’, and much more in this week’s episode!

Robots From Tomorrow is a weekly comics podcast recorded deep beneath the Earth’s surface. You can subscribe to it via iTunes or through the RSS feed at RobotsFromTomorrow.com. You can also follow Mike and Greg on Twitter. This episode is brought to you by Third Eye Comics. Enjoy your funny books.

Direct download: rft_187_mixdown.mp3
Category:Book Discussion -- posted at: 7:00pm EST

It wasn't their first creative partnership, or even their first long-form work together, but when comic fans think of the book they first noticed how good Ed Brubaker & Sean Phillips worked together, they almost always think of "Criminal". With the series now at Image Comics and being rereleased in new trade paperback collections, Mike & Greg take this opportunity to look at the duo's opening storyline: 'Coward'. What does it and the series as a whole know about crime fiction that so many imitators seem to miss? How does it stack up against the Eisner-winning sixth volume "The Last of the Innocent"? Where did the Brubaker/Archie connection first pop up? Why did the duo announce their exclusivity to Image? Who's the best colorist in their crew: Val Staples, Dave Stewart, or Elizabeth Breitweiser? All that and much much more about the whole world of Phillips and Brubaker is ready for your ears on this week's episode!

Robots From Tomorrow is a weekly comics podcast recorded deep beneath the Earth’s surface. You can subscribe to it via iTunes or through the RSS feed at RobotsFromTomorrow.com. You can also follow Mike and Greg on Twitter. This episode is brought to you by Third Eye Comics. Enjoy your funny books.

Direct download: rft_183_mixdown.mp3
Category:Book Discussion -- posted at: 8:00pm EST

Terry Gilliam calls him a god. Entire generations were taught the importance and power of satire by his examples. The highest honor FOR comics professional voted on exclusively BY comics professionals takes its name from him. His name was Harvey Kurtzman, and in 1959 he published “Harvey Kurtzman’s Jungle Book”, a collection of short comic tales intended for the mainstream adult readership almost 15 years before Will Eisner did likewise with “A Contract With God”. Unlike “Contract”, “Jungle Book” landed with a thud of epic proportions. So why are Mike & Greg talking about it today? Why is pure Kurtzman the best Kurtzman when you have artists like Wally Wood, Will Elder, and the like to bring his ideas to life? With all the accolades he achieved, is Kurtzman still underrated? Does “Jungle Book” still hold up almost 60 years later? Learn what brought Kurtzman from EC Comics to Ballantine Books, what did Frank Miller admitted helped him shamelessly steal from Will Eisner in his “Daredevil” run, how does “Jungle Book” stack up against “Comic Book Comix”, an earlier Dark Horse/Kitchen Sink release, and tons more in this week’s episode!

Robots From Tomorrow is a weekly comics podcast recorded deep beneath the Earth’s surface. You can subscribe to it via iTunes or through the RSS feed at RobotsFromTomorrow.com. You can also follow Mike and Greg on Twitter. This episode is brought to you by Third Eye Comics. Enjoy your funny books.

Direct download: rft_179_mixdown.mp3
Category:Book Discussion -- posted at: 7:00pm EST

Can we ever go home again? It's a question so many creators ask themselves when they revisit work from their earlier days. Mike & Greg take a look at how Toriyama has cracked that particular code with "Jaco", a book that touches on several themes and tones from the manga-ka's early "Dragon Ball" days while still letting him bring his mastery of craft to bear. A funny, adventurous romp, the titular Jaco is a super elite Galactic Patrolman sent to Earth to await the coming of a terrible monster… but he manages to sideswipe the Moon on his way in and crashes next to a small island. Maybe 'super elite' is supposed to be ironic? Find out why "Jaco" is a wonderful standalone manga story with subtle ties to Toriyama's later works, what manga tropes the cartoonist manages to celebrate and subvert simultaneously, how 'adorable' is a perfect descriptive for this book, which Neal Adams work gets compared to "Jaco", and a whole lot more in this week's episode!

Robots From Tomorrow is a weekly comics podcast recorded deep beneath the Earth’s surface. You can subscribe to it via iTunes or through the RSS feed at RobotsFromTomorrow.com. You can also follow Mike and Greg on Twitter. This episode is brought to you by Third Eye Comics. Enjoy your funny books.

Direct download: rft_175_mixdown.mp3
Category:Book Discussion -- posted at: 7:00pm EST

Thirty-eight years of continuous weekly publication has given Judge Dredd fans a huge back catalog of stories to choose from. Mike & Greg flex some Multiver-City One muscles in this episode and take an in-depth look at 'America', the shattering tale by Dredd co-creator John Wagner and artist Colin MacNeil that makes absolutely clear what separates Dredd from other comics action heroes. What makes it Wagner's personal favorite and the top of so many "Best of Dredd" lists? How accessible is it to new readers? Are the sequels (1996's 'Fading of the Light' and 2006's 'Cadet') any good? Why isn't Colin MacNeil a bigger name? Who was Victor Jara? What does an apology from Judge Dredd sound like, and what do you have to do to get one? All that and tons more in this week's episode!

Robots From Tomorrow is a weekly comics podcast recorded deep beneath the Earth’s surface. You can subscribe to it via iTunes or through the RSS feed at RobotsFromTomorrow.com. You can also follow Mike and Greg on Twitter. This episode is brought to you by Third Eye Comics. Enjoy your funny books.

Direct download: rft_171_mixdown.mp3
Category:Book Discussion -- posted at: 8:00pm EST

Although 1993 was not far into the decade, the year "Marvels" was published in some ways saw the peak of its legendary excess: gimmick covers, spinoff glut, character assassinating revamps, and enough grit & grime to block out the sun. But in the middle of all that came a small 4-issue period piece miniseries, from a writer no one cared about and an artist no one knew, with a clarity that rang through the clamor. Mike & Greg take a long look at that Busiek/Ross work, as well as the 2007 followup "Eye of the Camera", to see if it still holds up over 20 years later. What makes that miniseries so unique, even among other stories like "Kingdom Come" or "Earth X"? What does Alex Ross not get enough credit for? What happened to the originally planned "Marvels II"? If someone ripped a gash in the Rocky Mountains the size of the Grand Canyon, and then fixed it on live TV, would anybody care? What simple suggestion did Tom DeFalco make to Busiek that crystallized the whole story for him? All that and more in this week's episode!

Robots From Tomorrow is a weekly comics podcast recorded deep beneath the Earth’s surface. You can subscribe to it via iTunes or through the RSS feed at RobotsFromTomorrow.com. You can also follow Mike and Greg on Twitter. This episode is brought to you by Third Eye Comics. Enjoy your funny books.

Direct download: rft_167_mixdown.mp3
Category:Book Discussion -- posted at: 8:00pm EST

This week's episode swings the pendulum back in a more mainstream direction by taking aim at a Jim Starlin Big Two cosmic event book with an oddball collection of heroes and a Machiavellian manipulator at the center of things. "Infinity Gauntlet"? Nope! "Cosmic Odyssey"! To make things even better, Mike and Greg are joined on this journey into mystery by Multiversity Comics' own DC expert Brian Salvatore! The lads leave few, if any, stones unturned in this look back at the Prestige Format miniseries from 1988. Come for the Starlin talk, stay for the Mignola discussion and tons of other interesting tidbits, like what are each of our #fourcomics picks, which artist showed Brian that superheroes didn't have to fit a certain artistic mold, why Batman plays the whole "don't use guns" and "don't kill" things pretty fast and loose in this series, how his relationship with Superman should be handled, and who turns out to be the character most affected by this series.

Robots From Tomorrow is a weekly comics podcast recorded deep beneath the Earth’s surface. You can subscribe to it via iTunes or through the RSS feed at RobotsFromTomorrow.com. You can also follow Mike and Greg on Twitter. This episode is brought to you by Third Eye Comics. Enjoy your funny books.

Direct download: rft_161_mixdown.mp3
Category:Book Discussion -- posted at: 8:00pm EST

People often say there is a single line between fantasy and reality. But in Farel Dalrymple's "The Wrenchies", there are just as many lines between different realities as there are on the pages themselves. Described by Multiversity Comics' own Matthew Meylikhov as a book "about how damn great and powerful comic books are", Dalrymple's graphic novel is one part post-apocalyptic children's adventure, one part existential adult apocalypse, one part semiautobio, one part love letter to four-color stories, and one part alchemical x-factor. Each new reading brings as many questions as answers, but Mike and Greg take a stab at what Dalrymple is trying to say with Sherwood, Hollis, and the rest of the cast. Background is given, techniques are discussed, knowledge is dropped, and the unforgiving mistress that is watercolor is name-checked in this attempt to try and encapsulate what one of 2014's strongest OGN's means to its characters, its creator, and its audience.

Robots From Tomorrow is a weekly comics podcast recorded deep beneath the Earth’s surface. You can subscribe to it via iTunes or through the RSS feed at RobotsFromTomorrow.com. You can also follow Mike and Greg on Twitter. This episode is brought to you by Third Eye Comics. Enjoy your funny books.

Direct download: rft_157_mixdown.mp3
Category:Book Discussion -- posted at: 8:00pm EST